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Alcohol tax hoped to cut A&E visits for violent injury

Alcohol tax hoped to cut A&E visits for violent injury

Experts believe that just a 1% rise above inflation of booze sold in shops, supermarkets, pubs and restaurants could prove to be more effective than introducing a minimum price per unit.

A team from Cardiff University writing in the journal Injury Prevention state that thousands of hospital visits could be cut across England and Wales every year, though they did also state that cutting the deficiencies between the rich and the poor could also have a great effect.

Looking at recorded data for adults who had visited 100 A&E departments across England and Wales between 2005 and 2012, the team discovered that nearly 300,000 of those visits were made for injuries caused by violence with the main demographic being men aged between 18-30.

Accompanying data also showed that lower alcohol pricing in bars, shops and restaurants were also linked to more A&E attendances.

“The additional tax revenue gained, estimated at close to £1 billion a year, would be at the Treasury’s disposal, and could be used to offset the cost of alcohol-related harm to the NHS,” the report said.

“Reforming the current alcohol taxation system may be more effective at reducing violence-related injury than minimum unit pricing.”

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Alcohol tax 'will stop thousands being hurt in violence every year'

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